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... Because it's All in Your Mind!


Memory Spring Monthly

Want To Improve Your Memory? Work on Your Sense of Smell!

What a Smell by Vikram Sorathia

The holiday season is almost upon us. Soon the air will be filled with all those wonderful smells that bring back so many memories. As a matter of fact, scientists have found that our memories are so connected to smells that odor evoked therapy can be a great tool for helping people improve their memory. 
According to Amanda White, psychiatry research technologist at Penn State College of Medicine, our sense of smell is closely linked with memory, probably more so than for any of our other senses.  People with full olfactory function are able to think of smells that evoke particular memories; the scent of an orchard in blossom conjuring up recollections of a childhood picnic, for example.  This often happens spontaneously, with a smell acting as a trigger in recalling a long-forgotten event or experience.  


Socialize More to Improve Your Memory

Socializing 1 by Horst Gutman

Do you socialize enough for your brain? There’s an increasing amount of data that shows that expanding your social calendar helps your memory. As a matter of fact, there’s data that shows that increased socialization can slow the progression of dementia including Alzheimer’s disease.
According to the Journal of Aging Research, the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to triple over the next forty years.  Based upon their research, there are three non-pharmacological strategies to influence brain cognition, general functioning, and overall quality of life. These are: physical exercise, intellectual stimulation, and social interaction.


Work on Your Balance to Improve Your Memory

Balance by Rosmarie Voegtli

Balance is a vital skill and a core component of everyday life. Merriam-Webster defines it as your ability to move or to remain in a position without losing control or falling. Some of us have excellent balance, while some of us struggle with it. But did you know that working on your balance can improve brain function and memory?
In fact, those with the best balance are three times less likely to develop dementia, according to a University of Washington study. Another study showed that when balance training was incorporated into the exercise programs of elderly women with complaints of memory problems and confusion, their cognitive function improved significantly.


Use Neurobics to Help Your Memory and Brain Health

Olfactory Factory by Sam Felder

Over the past few years it’s become common knowledge that keeping your brain challenged is vital to the preservation of your memory and brain health. People play brain games, do crosswords, Sudoku, and other endeavors to help their memory. While they’re all great ways to help, did you know that there is a set of exercises that you can do that can have a positive impact on your memory and brain health? The exercises are are called Neurobics.
The term “Neurobics” was first coined by Lawrence Katz, Ph.D. in 1998. Neurobics is a system designed to help keep your brain fit and flexible as you age.  Neurobics are based on the theory that by presenting your brain with unusual and/or unexpected experiences using various combinations of physical senses (taste, touch, smell, sound, sight, etc.) and emotional sense, it creates more connections between brain cells and the production of neotrophins that help promote the development of nerve cell dendrites.   And make the surrounding cells stronger.